Let’s call it what it is: a depression

Are we about to witness the revival of Hoovervilles?

Are we about to witness the revival of Hoovervilles?

So, place your bets, readers.  How long will it be before some economic guru has the guts to admit that we’re living in the midst of an economic depression? Or is it the case that we’re just hanging around waiting for the next recession to come along, like the London bus of legend: three arrive at the same time and then we can call it a “depression”. So we’ve had two recessions, when’s the next one due [looks at watch]? I’m freezing my arse off!

Recessions, depressions, panics, slumps, credit crunches, call them what you will but they all amount to a failure of the capitalist system. The problem is that no one in authority (and I use that word loosely) wants to stand up and say that “This is a depression”. An economic depression apparently is determined by a sequence and length of recessions but no one wants to agree on the number. That’s because there is no set figure but there was an alleged benchmark to which all future depressions are supposed to aim. We are also told that in order for a recession to be classified as a depression, there needs to be a contraction in economic activity. This is happening now with banks refusing to lend to small businesses.

We are told that the last depression, now referred to as the Great (apparently) Depression of 1929 to 1939 was the longest and deepest depression. But there’s nothing “great” about a depression. This depression was preceded by the Depression of 1920 – 21, which was later downgraded to the status of “recession”. There were also 2 recessions during the 1920s. In Britain, the previous Great Depression of 1873 to 1896 was later called the “Long Depression” and was preceded by the Panic of 1872.

The tale of that period has been told innumerable times: a panic on the stock market and a run on the banks that combined with poor harvests to spawn a series of recessions that resulted in extreme hardship for millions, if not, billions of people around the world.

It was a “contagion” that began in Wall Street and spread around the world like some kind of economic plague. Shirts, jobs and homes were lost in short order. It was a tough time but not for the ruling classes, whose social and economic capital exists in perpetuity… much like the inexhaustible body armour cheat in a console kill game (Medal of Hour, etc). They would survive. They would have to get used to having foie gras only twice a week instead of six until the good times returned (on its high horse).

But could there ever be another depression that matches or exceeds the Great One for sheer, uh, depression? Apparently not. We were supposedly inoculated against further outbreaks of widespread panic… until Callaghan discovered monetarism and the genie was released from his bottle, free to wreak havoc.

The Great Depression has been fixed in the public memory as  a sort of golden age of economic depressions. It has supposedly surpassed previous depressions and panics – each and every one of them devastating in their own right, but ignored for ideological reasons – for its near-total effect on all levels of society. The previous depression has become folklore; its mythology has become the model of perfection against which certain economists and their forecaster allies (sic) judge current and future economic catastrophes.  But why?

Is it because our political leaders (that’s another word I use with caution) lack the intellectual courage to admit the truth of the situation, or is it because they have reached their intellectual limits and lack the honesty to admit that they have no plan for the future of civilization? Could it be because they don’t want to “panic” the public with the admission that the current economic situation is, in truth, a depression?

The issue of mass panic has never stopped them before.

Governments have never been afraid to use fear to coerce the public into accepting their version of the truth in order to prosecute pointless wars, as this clip reminds us.

That’s “good” panic. It’s the kind of panic that protects “freedom” and defends “our way of life”. Today William Hague claimed to have seen “some evidence” that the Assad regime in Syria has chemical weapons. There is a school of thought that believes the only way out of an economic crisis is to start a war. But wars are costly.

Depressions and recessions only ever benefit one kind of person and I don’t need to tell you that person isn’t you or I, dear reader. This is a time when the capitalist sees the opportunity to pit worker against worker. We have already seen how this government uses divide and rule in the way tries to create a false conflict between public and private sector.

This is a depression.

The have been dark murmurings of another recession on the horizon and yet, Osborne continues on his reckless course like a blind ship’s captain, who’s full of Dutch courage after drinking his crew’s rum rations.  But he’s fine. He’s got a wallpaper fortune and an Irish baronetcy to look forward to… not that he isn’t loaded already.

Two and a half years of this government’s bungling has done nothing to give people hope. Instead, prices increase year on year and incomes stay the same for average workers. For many people, there is nothing to look forward to. There is no trust in this government or in Her Majesty’s feckless opposition to put things right either, with disciplinarian Liam Byrne claiming that his party didn’t do enough to clamp down on benefit “cheats”. Trust left town on the same train as hope and it isn’t coming back.

There is a solution to this. It’s just that the ruling class and their lackeys in the media and the think-tanks don’t want to hear it. They have much to gain from economic catastrophes but, potentially, so do we.

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1 Comment

Filed under Conservative Party, Cuts, economic illiteracy, Economics, Government & politics, laissez faire capitalism, neoliberalism

One response to “Let’s call it what it is: a depression

  1. harryseeingred

    Spot on Ray.

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