Postcards From the Barricades (Part 3): a look at what the Tory press is saying

Since the national student demo in London on Wednesday, the Tory press has waged a campaign of smears and disinformation.  The issue revolves around the use of the word “violence” and what it means. The BBC have led the way in insisting that there were “violent scenes” at Millbank Tower. Newsnight’s Jeremy Paxman and Radio 2’s Jeremy Vine have all tried to claim that the intention of the students was to act in a violent manner.  Paxman’s questioning of Claire Solomon, who seems to have been identified as a sort of ‘ringleader’, took the line of a CPS prosecutor and thus was the interrogatory voice of the state. The attitude of the BBC’s anchors and reporters has been consistent with that of a state broadcaster – yet the bods at the Telegraph still have the gall to claim that the BBC  is “biased” towards  Tories, Europhobes and other right wing lunatics (remember the run up to the Iraq invasion or the Battle of Orgreave Colliery?).

The entire Tory press without exception has made the claim that the protest was violent and was hijacked by ‘outsiders’. Writing in the Telegraph, The Great Lord of Darkness said,

No doubt our Chinese friends had a pretty good laugh at the TV news showing our happy students in democratic Britain express their delight at their lot by trashing buildings and assaulting the police,

Here is the lie that students “assaulted” the police.  I was there, I saw no student assault a policeman/woman. I would demand evidence from Tebbitt but I know that it will not be forthcoming. Here we also have a clue into their thinking: property is more important that people or their needs. The police’s primary role in our capitalist society is to protect property from the masses.

Benedict Brogan, blogging for the same paper repeated the line about “violence”,

Westminster and the police have been caught on the hop by the size and violence of the demonstration currently battering the glass walls of Millbank tower, or specifically 30 Millbank, the lowrise part of the complex where CCHQ is based.

He continues,

Objects are being thrown, and there appears to be a separate confrontation going on inside the lobby. Heads are being cracked, and some of the more excitable demonstrators seem eager to take on the cops. Perhaps we shouldn’t be too surprised. Aaron Porter, the leader of the NUS, was on the telly last week using fairly extreme language to warn that students would hound MPs in their constituencies.

Hang on, no heads were cracked. Furthermore, Aaron Porter made some pusillanimous statement about “condemning the actions of a small minority”. I guess our Benny didn’t see that. The truth sort of gets in the way of a good horror story. Brogan uses the occasion of the demonstrations to make a cheap swipe at the opposition,

the NUS and Labour have formed such a tight alliance on the issue: this protest is in effect a Labour protest, and however the NUS and Labour try to disown the riot, it is their show – it wouldn’t have happened without them.

Let me get this straight, this was a “Labour protest”? I saw no one from the Labour Party (though it is possible that some students had voted Labour) on the march yet Brogan has made the suggestion Labour being behind the demonstration and, by extension, the ‘violence’. His last paragraph is very telling and reveals the lies that the right wing press resort to,

UPDATE @10.15pm: Labour chums have chided me for being unfair and tendentious when I suggest that the riot was the NUS and Labour’s show. Of course I don’t mean that they orchestrated it or even willed it. But Labour has lined itself against this reform, it supported the march, Harriet Harman made a big number out of taunting Nick Clegg about tuition fees at PMQs, and the NUS is a Labour subsidiary and forcing house for Labour politicians. So when what was supposed to be a Labour supported demo designed to put political pressure on the Coalition ends up with the mess at Millbank, I reckon it’s fair to say that this is an awkward moment for Labour.

Again, he has no evidence to claim that this was a “Labour supported demo”, so he lies.

This blogger calls herself “CyberBoris”...guess who she supports? She chides those horrid lefty students and suggests to them that they  should have adopted Gandhi’s tactics,

Twitter is awash with students foaming at the mouth, in their illogical and ill-judged attempts to insist that peaceful protest does not work.  “Can anyone” squeaked @noldorstu “name a peaceful protest that achieved something?”  “Yes!” I tweeted back enthusiastically.  “Mahatma Gandhi’s Salt March and his policy of peaceful protest that changed the history of India!”  I didn’t even go to uni, so possibly David Cameron might consider raising tuition fees to £18K.  These students are clearly ill informed and any investment in such a volatile risk is money down the pan!

Er, wait a minute, someone hasn’t actually read their history here and has plucked out a single event (probably from Dickie Attenborough’s film, Gandhi). Besides, peaceful protesters usually end up dead. She’s completely ignored the fact that Gandhi was assassinated (or that he was a raving anti-Semite). Here is my first comment,

Yes, the whole of India was transformed by partition and the violence that ensued in the aftermath. Nice bit of propaganda there. Of course, you wouldn’t find it ironic that ex-Bullingdon Club members condemn a group of students who smashed a couple of windows.

And hers,

The truth is not propoganda. It was the peaceful protest that made the difference, the violence was something else.

This argument about the Bullingdon Club is absolutely pathetic. There was no violence even remotely resembling the violence yesterday. They all just got pissed and chucked a few flower pots. You are utterly ridiculous to bring this up.

Even when they are confronted with the truth, they lie. The Bullingdon Club’s antics are legendary and have even been the subject of a Channel 4 film written by the Honourable Tobes. What I find so amusing about her reply is the way she says “The truth is not propoganda”.  She quite clearly understands neither. She refuses to acknowledge the antics of the Bullingdon Club nor does she want to do her own work.

Just not any good to produce unsubstantiated accusations against the Bullingdon Club. Where is your evidence that what they did was any more serious than a few smashed glasses, the odd window and some flower pots, caused by heavy drinking? “Accounts are legion?” That’s not evidence. Produce some evidence or withdraw your daft statement.

Pathetic. This is a classic example of Tory denial that goes well with their sense of entitlement.

Back to the Torygraph, Today’s edition says that a “Lawyer’s son was behind the student protests”. Fuck’s sake, what is it with these right wingers? The article says that,

History student Karl Sielman-Parry, who uses the alias “WorkersDreadnought”, said a “workers and students’ bloc” should band together rather than go along with the official National Union of Students’ march.

He distributed a leaflet stamped with the anarchist “A” symbol calling for “Direct Action!, Occupation!, Strike”.

I wonder where they get this information from? Well, it turns out that the Telegraph and the other Tory papers have been trawling Britain’s student population for snitches. This article tries to tell us that students aren’t in charge of their own thoughts and actions and have to rely on a group of outsiders to stir up trouble,

The Radical Workers’ and Students’ Bloc, identified by red and black flags flown from the roof of Millbank Tower, was organised by the Anarchist Federation, along with the London Solidarity Federation. The Leeds Class War group and the Whitechapel Anarchist Group also confirmed yesterday that they were involved in the trouble

The suggestion here is that students aren’t anarchists and anarchists aren’t students.

The right wing press have also tried to claim that lecturers from Goldmiths College condoned and supported violent behaviour. The Torygraph again,

But the lecturers from Goldsmiths made no reference to the injuries suffered by police and some students as they gave the protest a glowing report.

“Yesterday was a really good natured but equally angry demonstration against the damage that the coalition is doing to higher education,” their statement said.

“Yes, that got out of hand, but yes, it also got media attention across the world.”

With reportage like this,  you can understand why Andrew Gilligan writes for The Telegraph.

This Daily Mail article tells us that the student demonstrators were all privileged. They even have a ‘story’ from Tory Party chair, Saveeda Warsi who tells us,

What I find truly baffling is the number of Labour MPs who used Twitter to support those protesters committing criminal damage and endangering lives. Former Labour leadership candidate John McDonnell MP tweeted: ‘Just shows what can be done when people get angry. We must build on this.’ And Labour MP Alex Cunningham wrote: ‘Well done our students – thousands outside the office getting stuck into the Lib Dem/Tory government over tuition fees.’

Warsi repeats the lie that Labour were behind the occupation of Millbank Tower. Ah, nothing like a bit of black propaganda. She adds,

There is nothing fair about attacking innocent people or property. Political violence must never prevail over rational debate. So it’s high time we restored reason to the debate on student finance and fairness.

So it’s all about “property”? Who are these “innocent people” of whom she speaks? Her staff?

Over at The Spectator, Rod Liddle couldn’t resist making up a couple of porkies,

If you fancy a laugh, and have the time to spare, check out the websitefor REVOLUTION, aka Permanent Revolution, the Trot group some of whose members smashed up Conservative Central Office this week.

First, it’s anarchists who smashed the windows, now it’s a “Trot group”. Can’t these liars make up their minds? Evidently not.

Another national demonstration is being planned. I expect the police to be better prepared and I also expect more smears, lies and yellow journalism.

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8 Comments

Filed under Big Society, Education, Government & politics

8 responses to “Postcards From the Barricades (Part 3): a look at what the Tory press is saying

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention Postcards From the Barricades (Part 3): debunking the lies of the Tory press « Guy Debord's Cat -- Topsy.com

  2. angelnstar

    Hi, you quote an extract from my blog on my website, http://cyberboris.wordpress.com, and as you can see I am a firm supporter of Boris Johnson. Boris is the most outstanding politician in the UK, no, let me rephrase that to include the US, there is nobody to match him there either.

    My blog was written in response to a tweeter to asked if anyone could name a peaceful protest that had achieved something. My answer was therefore bang on the money.

    I do not recall saying that anyone should emulate Ganghi. However, I firmly believe that if you are violent, you immediately lose the argument. By being violent, you are saying your argument, in itself, is not strong enough to convince anyone, therefore you have to employ violent means.

    Sadly, any students getting involved in violence are just fools to themselves.

    http://cyberboris.wordpress.com/2010/11/11/violent-students-are-only-trashing-their-own-futures/

    • I’ll take no lessons in honesty, integrity or anything else from a self-styled supporter of Boris Johnson. Your hero-worship of Johnson tells me all that I need to know about you. I found this part of your comment rather interesting ” Boris is the most outstanding politician in the UK, no, let me rephrase that to include the US, there is nobody to match him there either”. Tell me, why have you mentioned the US?

      This is funny,
      “I do not recall saying that anyone should emulate Ganghi”. Maybe not, but you suggested it.

  3. angelnstar

    Guy, the Bullingdon boys always paid in full for any damage they caused. That doesn’t excuse vandalism, but it ensures that nobody suffers financially.

    If the students on the demo involved in wrecking the entrance of Millbank Tower promised to pay in full for the damage they created, there would be a lot more sympathy for their cause.

    I don’t think you should accuse people of lying when they are not doing that. I was answering a straight question “Can anyone name a peaceful protest that achieved something?” The protest about salt was peaceful and it changed the system.

    It is you who drew the conclusion that I meant the students to emulate Gandhi. I was asked a question and answered it. In fairness, you should apologise for calling me a liar.

    When I blog for Boris, I always make a big effort to provide links backing up any assertions I may make, when I contributed to his personal website, that is what he wanted us to do.

    Fortunately this is a free country and we are entitled to think differently from you if we wish, and entitled to express our views. You mustn’t overeact and call people names, just because they do not agree with you.

    • You said,
      “the Bullingdon boys always paid in full for any damage they caused. That doesn’t excuse vandalism, but it ensures that nobody suffers financially”

      So paying for the damage makes it ok? Here we have a classic example of upper class arrogance. Just throw a wad of cash at the restaurant owner. The Bullingdon Boys smashed restaurants because they could. The underlying motivation for doing so was not due to a sense of injustice or any form of anger but but they had the wealth and the privilege to engage in a little vandalism. The motivation of the students who smashed the windows of 30 Millbank no doubt did so out of anger and frustration. Not because they felt that they were entitled to do so by dint of birth.

      You said,
      “I don’t think you should accuse people of lying when they are not doing that. I was answering a straight question “Can anyone name a peaceful protest that achieved something?” The protest about salt was peaceful and it changed the system”

      This is predicated on the belief that only peaceful protests achieve anything when history shows us this is not necessarily the case. The Poll Tax riots had the effect of forcing the government to abolish the tax and replace with the Council Tax. But that’s just one example. Of course, I don’t condone violence but people have a right to be angry and, from time to time, they will express that anger. The question that you and other critics need to answer is “why“?

      You said,
      “It is you who drew the conclusion that I meant the students to emulate Gandhi. I was asked a question and answered it. In fairness, you should apologise for calling me a liar”.

      I said in my earlier comment that you “suggested” it. In fact, the clue is in your blog title. By the way, I have edited my blog to reflect this.

      You said,
      “Fortunately this is a free country and we are entitled to think differently from you if we wish, and entitled to express our views. You mustn’t overeact and call people names, just because they do not agree with you”.

      First, this is not a “free country”. Freedom of speech is a chimera. He who has the fattest wallet can sue another for defamation in a court of law. Those who don’t have the income do not enjoy the same luxury. I take you realise the expense involved in a defamation suit?

      Second, where did I resort to “name calling”? Examples please.

  4. angelnstar

    ps. Boris Johnson was born in the US. Technically, he could run for President.

  5. telaversion

    I can assure you as leader of the anarchists – that we have always done everything everywhere to everyone and intend to continue to do so – any leftist groups claiming glory for our “ils ne veulent pas être en reste” and all that … well they are leftists & all glory they may claim is ours

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